praying-the-rosary

On Bended Knees: Prayers for the Faithful Departed

Written by Jepoy Meneses on . Posted in Cool Catholics, Program Updates

Prayer for the dead is one of the greatest acts of charity we can perform. Our prayers help them during their time in Purgatory, so that they can enter more quickly into the fullness of heaven. These prayers are especially suited for offering a novena on behalf of the dead, or for praying during those seasons of the year (November, in the Western Church; Lent, in the Eastern Church) designated by the Church as times of fervent prayer for the faithful departed.

De Profundis

The De Profundis is a penitential psalm that is sung as part of vespers (evening prayer) and in commemorations of the dead. It is also a good psalm to express our sorrow as we prepare for the Sacrament of Confession.

Prayer for Mercy on the Souls in Purgatory

While we know that all who are in Purgatory will enter into Heaven, we are still bound by charity to try to lessen the suffering of the Holy Souls through our prayers and deeds. While our first responsibility is to those people we have known, it is important to remember in our prayers those souls who are most forsaken.

A Prayer for a Deceased Mother

This prayer is a good way to remember our mother. It is especially useful to pray as a novena on the anniversaries of her death; or during the month of November, which the Church sets aside for prayer for the dead; or simply anytime that her memory comes to mind.

A Prayer for a Deceased Father

This prayer is a good way to remember our father. It is especially useful to pray as a novena on the anniversaries of his death; or during the month of November, which the Church sets aside for prayer for the dead; or simply anytime that his memory comes to mind.

A Prayer for Deceased Parents

This prayer is a good way to remember our parents, who have gone before us. It is especially useful to pray as a novena on the anniversaries of their deaths; or during the month of November, which the Church sets aside for prayer for the dead; or simply anytime that their memory comes to mind.

Prayer for All the Deceased

This beautiful prayer, drawn from the Byzantine Divine Liturgy, reminds us that Christ’s victory over death brings us all the possibility of eternal rest. We pray for all of those who have gone before us, that they, too, may enter into Heaven.

Prayer for the Holy Souls in Purgatory

Christ’s mercy encompasses all men. He desires the salvation of everyone, and so we approach Him with confidence that He will have mercy on the Holy Souls in Purgatory, who have already proved their love for Him.

Eternal Rest

One of the most commonly recited of Catholic prayers in times past, this prayer has fallen into disuse in the last few decades. Prayer for the dead is one of the greatest acts of charity we can perform.

Eternal Memory

This prayer is used in Eastern Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. The “eternal memory” mentioned in the prayer is remembrance by God, which is another way of saying that the soul has entered heaven and enjoys eternal life.

Weekly Prayers for the Faithful Departed

The Church offers us different prayers that we can say each day of the week for the faithful departed. These are especially useful for offering a novena on behalf of the dead, or for praying during those seasons of the year (November, in the Western Church; Lent, in the Eastern Church) designated by the Church as times of fervent prayer for the…

Sunday Prayer for the Faithful Departed

This is a prayer for the faithful departed to be offered on Sundays.

Monday Prayer for the Faithful Departed

This prayer is said on Mondays for the souls of the faithful departed.

Tuesday Prayer for the Faithful Departed

On Tuesdays, Catholics pray this prayer for the souls of the faithful departed.

Wednesday Prayer for the Faithful Departed

Catholics pray this prayer on Wednesdays for the souls of the faithful departed.

Thursday Prayer for the Faithful Departed

We should remember the faithful departed on Thursdays by praying this prayer.

Friday Prayer for the Faithful Departed

This prayer is offered on Fridays for the souls of the faithful departed.

Saturday Prayer for the Faithful Departed

Catholics pray this prayer on Saturdays for the souls of the faithful departed.

Litany of the Saints

On Bended Knees: The Litany of the Saint

Written by Jepoy Meneses on . Posted in Cool Catholics, Program Updates

The Litany of the Saints (Latin, Litania Sanctorum) is a sacred prayer of the Roman Catholic Church, the Western Rites of the Orthodox Church, and some Anglican Churches. It is a prayer of invocation to the Triune God, and prayers for the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Angels and all the martyrs and saints upon whom Christianity was founded. It is most prominently sung during the Paschal Vigil at the beginning of Sacraments of Initiation for those to be received that night into the Church, in other celebrations of the Sacrament of Baptism (the first of the Sacraments of Initiation,) and in the liturgy for Holy Orders.

The names of the Saints to be invoked appear in the Church’s Martyrology.

It is illicit to invoke the names of those whom the Church has not admitted to the list of those canonized or beatified (though in practice, many spurious or fabricated names are sometimes sung in defiance of this rubric, and one well known published version includes Origen, a theologian of the Church not qualified for public veneration.)

The order in which people are invoked is as follows:

(1) Our Lady, the Virgin Mary (2) The Angels (3) Patriarchs and Prophets including St John the Baptist, and always concluding with Our Lady’s spouse, Saint Joseph) (4) The Apostles and Disciples of the Lord (5) Martyrs (6) Bishops and Doctors of the Church (7) Priests and Religious (8) Laity

In the Latin language version of the Litany, the names of one or more saints are chanted by a cantor or choir, and the congregants reply with either, Ora pro nobis (if one saint is addressed) or Orate pro nobis the plural imperative of the verb, (if more than one saint is addressed). Both responses translate to “Pray for us.” However, it is permissible to personalize the Litany of Saints for a funeral rite or other Mass for the dead, and this was famously done during the funeral of Pope John Paul II, the response was Ora[te] pro eo, or “Pray for him.”

Following the invocation of the saints, the Litany concludes with a series of supplications to God to hear the prayers of the worshipers.

 

Latin and Greek (original) English (translation)
V.[1] Kyrie, eléison. V. Lord, have mercy.
R.[2] Christe, eléison. R. Christ, have mercy.
V. Kyrie, eléison. V. Lord, have mercy.
V. Christe, audi nos. V. O Christ, hear us.
R. Christe, exáudi nos. R. O Christ, graciously hear us.
V. Pater de cælis, Deus. V. O God the Father of heaven.
R. Miserére nobis. R. Have mercy upon us.
V. Fili, Redémptor mundi, Deus. V. O God the Son, Redeemer of the world.
R. Miserére nobis. R. Have mercy upon us.
V. Spíritus Sancte, Deus. V. O God the Holy Spirit.
R. Miserére nobis. R. Have mercy upon us.
V. Sancta Trínitas, unus Deus. V. O Holy Trinity, one God.
R. Miserére nobis. R. Have mercy upon us.
V. Sancta María. V. Holy Mary.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Dei Génetrix. V. Holy Mother of God.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Virgo vírginum. V. Holy Virgin of virgins.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Michael. V. Saint Michael.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Gabriel. V. Saint Gabriel.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Raphael. V. Saint Raphael.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Angeli et Archangeli. V. All ye holy Angels and Archangels.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti beatórum Spírituum ordines. V. All ye holy orders of blessed Spirits.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Joánnes Baptista. V. Saint John the Baptist.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Josephe. V. Saint Joseph.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Patriárchæ et Prophetæ. V. All ye holy Patriarchs and Prophets.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Petre. V. Saint Peter.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Paule. V. Saint Paul.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Andrea. V. Saint Andrew.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Jacobe. V. Saint James.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Joánnes. V. Saint John.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Thoma. V. Saint Thomas.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Jacobe. V. Saint James.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Philippe. V. Saint Philip.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Bartholomæe. V. Saint Bartholomew.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Matthæe. V. Saint Matthew.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Simon. V. Saint Simon.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Thaddæe. V. Saint Jude.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Matthia. V. Saint Matthias.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Barnaba. V. Saint Barnabas.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Luca. V. Saint Luke.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Marce. V. Saint Mark.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Apóstoli et Evangelistæ. V. All ye holy Apostles and Evangelists.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Discípuli Dómini. V. All ye holy Disciples of the Lord.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Innocéntes. V. All ye Holy Innocents.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Stephane. V. Saint Stephen.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Laurénti. V. Saint Lawrence.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Vincenti. V. Saint Vincent.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancti Fabiane et Sebastiane. V. Saint Fabian and Saint Sebastian.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancti Joánnes et Paule. V. Saint John and Saint Paul.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancti Cosma et Damiane. V. Saint Cosmas and Saint Damian.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancti Gervasi et Protasi. V. Saint Gervasius and Saint Protasius.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Mártyres. V. All ye holy Martyrs.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Silvester. V. Saint Sylvester.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Gregóri. V. Saint Gregory.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Ambrósi. V. Saint Ambrose.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Augustine. V. Saint Augustine.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Hieronyme. V. Saint Jerome.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Martine. V. Saint Martin.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Nicolaë. V. Saint Nicholas.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Pontifices et Confessores. V. All ye holy Bishops and Confessors.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Doctores. V. All ye holy Doctors.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Antoni. V. Saint Anthony.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Benedicte. V. Saint Benedict.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Bernarde. V. Saint Bernard.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Dominice. V. Saint Dominic.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Francisce. V. Saint Francis.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Sacerdótes et Levitæ. V. All ye holy Priests and Levites.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Monachi et Eremitæ. V. All ye holy Monks and Hermits.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta María Magdalena. V. Saint Mary Magdalene.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Agatha. V. Saint Agatha.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Lucia. V. Saint Lucy.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Agnes. V. Saint Agnes.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Cæcilia. V. Saint Cecilia.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Catharina. V. Saint Catherine.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Anastasia. V. Saint Anastasia.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sanctæ Vírgines et Víduæ. V. All ye holy Virgins and Widows.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes Sancti et Sanctæ Dei. V. All ye Holy, Righteous, and Elect of God.
R. Intercédite pro nobis. R. Intercede for us.
V. Propitius esto. V. Be thou merciful.
R. Parce nobis, Dómine. R. Spare us, Lord.
V. Propitius esto. V. Be thou merciful.
R. Exáudi nos, Dómine. R. Graciously hear us, Lord.
V. Ab omni malo. V. From all evil.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Ab omni peccáto. V. From all deadly sin.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Ab ira tua. V. From thine anger.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A subitanea et improvisa morte. V. From sudden and unrepentant death.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Ab insídiis diaboli. V. From the crafts and assaults of the devil.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Ab ira, et ódio, et omni mala voluntáte. V. From anger, and hatred, and all uncharitableness.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A spíritu fornicatiónis. V. From the spirit of fornication.
R. Líbera nos, Domine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A fulgure et tempestáte. V. From lightning and tempest.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A flagello terræmotus. V. From the peril of earthquake, fire, and flood.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A peste, fame et bello. V. From pestilence, famine, and battle.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A morte perpetua. V. From everlasting damnation.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per mystérium sanctæ Incarnatiónis tuæ. V. By the mystery of thy Holy Incarnation.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per advéntum tuum. V. By thine Advent.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per nativitátem tuam. V. By thy Nativity.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per baptismum et sanctum jejunium tuum. V. By thy Baptism and holy Fasting.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per crucem et passiónem tuam. V. By thy Cross and Passion.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per mortem et sepultúram tuam. V. By thy precious Death and Burial.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per sanctam resurrectiónem tuam. V. By thy holy Resurrection.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per admirábilem ascensiónem tuam. V. By thy glorious Ascension.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per advéntum Spíritus Sancti Paracliti. V. By the coming of the Holy Spirit the Comforter.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. In die judícii. V. In the day of judgement.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Peccatóres. V. Even though we be sinners.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut nobis parcas. V. That it may please thee to spare us.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut nobis indulgeas. V. That it may please thee to pity and pardon us.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut ad veram pœniténtiam nos perducere dignéris. V. That it may please thee to give us true repentance.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut Ecclésiam tuam sanctam regere et conservare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to rule and govern thy holy Church.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut domnum Apostolicum et omnes ecclesiásticos ordines in sancta religióne conservare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to preserve the Apostolic Lord, and to keep all orders of the Church in thy sacred religion.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut inimícos sanctæ Ecclésiæ humiliare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to overthrow the enemies of thy holy Church.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut régibus et princípibus christiánis pacem et veram concordiam donare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to bestow on all Christian kings and princes true peace and concord.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut cuncto pópulo christiáno pacem et unitátem largiri dignéris. V. That it may please thee to give to all Christian nations both peace and unity.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut omnes errántes ad unitátem Ecclésiæ revocare, et infidéles univérsos ad Evangélii lumen perducere dignéris. V. That it may please thee to restore unity to thy Church, and to lead all unbelievers into the light of thy holy Gospel.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut nosmetípsos in tuo sancto servítio confortare et conservare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to strengthen and preserve us in true worshipping of thee.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut mentes nostras ad cæléstia desidéria erigas. V. That it may please thee to endue our hearts with heavenly desires.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut ómnibus benefactóribus nostris sempitérna bona retríbuas. V. That it may please thee to bestow on all our benefactors thine everlasting benefits.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut ánimas nostras, fratrum, propinquorum et benefactórum nostrórum ab ætérna damnatióne erípias. V. That it may please thee to deliver from eternal damnation our souls, and those of our brethren, kindred, and benefactors.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut fructus terræ dare et conservare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to give and preserve to our use the kindly fruits of the earth.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut ómnibus fidelibus defunctis réquiem ætérnam donare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to bestow upon all thy faithful departed rest eternal.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut nos exáudire dignéris. V. That it may please thee graciously to hear our prayer.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Fili Dei. V. O Son of God.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccáta mundi. V. O Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the world.
R. Parce nobis, Dómine. R. Spare us, Lord.
V. Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccáta mundi. V. O Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the world.
R. Exáudi nos, Dómine. R. Graciously hear us, Lord.
V. Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccáta mundi. V. O Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the world.
R. Miserére nobis. R. Have mercy upon us.
V. Christe, audi nos. V. O Christ, hear us.
R. Christe, exáudi nos. R. O Christ, graciously hear us.
V. Kyrie, eléison. V. Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Christe, eléison. Kyrie, eléison. R. Christ, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us.
Pater noster. (secréto usque ad) Our Father. (Which words are said aloud, and the rest secretly to):
V. Et ne nos indúcas in tentatiónem. V. And lead us not into temptation.
R. Sed líbera nos a malo. R. But deliver us from evil.
Psalmus 69. Deus, in adjutórium Psalm 69. Deus, in adjutórium
1 Deus, in adjutórium meum inténde: * Dómine ad adjuvándum me festína. 1 HASTE thee, O God, to deliver me; * make haste to help me, O LORD.
2 Confundántur et revereántur, * qui quærunt ánimam meam. 2 Let them be ashamed and confounded that seek after my soul; * let them be turned backward and put to confusion that wish me evil.
3 Avertántur retrórsum, et erubéscant, * qui volunt mihi mala. 3 Let them for their reward be soon brought to shame, * that cry over me, There! there!
4 Avertántur statim erubescéntes, * qui dicunt mihi : Euge, euge. 4 But let all those that seek thee be joyful and glad in thee: * and let all such as delight in thy salvation say always, The Lord be praised.
5 Exsúltent et læténtur in te omnes qui quærunt te, * et dicant semper : Magnificétur Dóminus : qui díligunt salutáre tuum. 5 As for me, I am poor and in misery: * haste thee unto me, O God.
6 Ego vero egénus, et pauper sum : * Deus, ádjuva me. 6 Thou art my helper, and my redeemer: * O LORD, make no long tarrying.
7 Adjútor meus, et liberátor meus es tu : * Dómine, ne moréris.
8 Glória Patri, et Fílio, et Spirítui Sancto. 8 Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
9 Sicut erat in princípio, et nunc, et semper, * et in sæcula sæculórum. Amen. 9 As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
V. Salvos fac servos tuos. V. O God, save thy servants.
R. Deus meus, sperántes in te. R. That put their trust in thee.
V. Esto nobis, Dómine, turris fortitúdinis. V. Be unto us, O Lord, a tower of strength.
R. A fácie inimíci. R. From the face of the enemy.
V. Nihil profíciat inimícus in nobis. V. Let the enemy prevail nothing against us.
R. Et fílius iniquitátis non appónat nocére nobis. R. Nor the son of wickedness approach to afflict us.
V. Dómine, non secúndum peccáta nostra fácias nobis. V. O Lord, deal not with us after our sins.
R. Neque secúndum iniquitátes nostras retríbuas nobis. R. Neither reward us according to our iniquities.
V. Orémus pro Pontifice nostro (Nomen). V. Let us pray for our Pope (Name).
R. Dóminus consérvet eum, et vivíficet eum, et beátum fáciat eum in terra, et beátum fáciat eum in terra, et non tradat eum in ánimam inimicórum ejus. R. The Lord preserve him and keep him alive, that he may be blessed upon earth; and deliver not thou him into the will of his enemies.
(Vacante Apostolica Sede, Versus cum suo Responsorio præteritur.) (If the Holy See is vacant, the above Versicle with its Response is omitted.)
V. Orémus pro benefactóribus nostris. V. Let us pray for our benefactors.
R. Retribúere dignáre, Dómine, ómnibus, nobis bona faciéntibus propter nomen tuum, vitam ætérnam. Amen. R. Vouchsafe, O Lord, for thy Name’s sake, to reward with eternal life all them that do us good. Amen.
V. Orémus pro fidelibus defunctis. V. Let us pray for the faithful departed.
R. Réquiem ætérnam dona eis, Dómine, et lux perpétua luceat eis. R. Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon them.
V. Requiéscant in pace. V. May they rest in peace.
R. Amen. R. Amen.
V. Pro frátribus nostris abséntibus. V. Let us pray for our absent brethren.
R. Salvos fac servos tuos, Deus meus, sperántes in te. R. Save thy servants, O my God, that put their trust in thee.
V. Mitte eis, Dómine, auxílium de sancto. V. Send them help, O Lord, from thy holy place.
R. Et de Sion tuere eos. R. And from Zion deliver them.
V. Dómine, exáudi oratiónem meam. V. O Lord, hear my prayer.
R. Et clamor meus ad te véniat. R. And let my cry come unto thee.
V. Dóminus vobíscum. V. The Lord be with you.
R. Et cum spíritu tuo. R. And with thy spirit.
Oremus. (Oratio) Let us pray. (Collects)
Deus, cui proprium est miseréri semper et parcere : súscipe deprecatiónem nostram ; ut nos, et omnes fámulos tuos, quos delictórum catena constringit, miserátio tuæ pietátis clementer absolvat. O God, whose nature and property is ever to have mercy and to forgive : receive our humble petitions ; and though we be tied and bound by the chain of our sins, yet let the pitifulness of thy great mercy loose us.
Exáudi, quæsumus, Dómine, supplícium preces, et confiténtium tibi parce peccátis : ut páriter nobis indulgéntiam tríbuas benignus et pacem. We beseech thee, O Lord, mercifully to hear the prayers of thy humble servants, and to forgive the sins of them that confess the same unto thee : that they may obtain of thy loving-kindness pardon and peace.
Ineffábilem nobis, Dómine, misericórdiam tuam clementer osténde : ut simul nos et a peccátis ómnibus exuas, et a pœnis, quas pro his meremur, erípias. O Lord, we pray thee, shew forth upon us thy servants the abundance of thy unspeakable mercy : that we may be delivered from the chain of our sins, and from the punishment which for the same we have most righteously deserved.
Deus, qui culpa offenderis, pœniténtia placaris : preces pópuli tui supplicántis propítius réspice ; et flagélla tuæ iracúndiæ, quæ pro peccátis nostris meremur, averte. O God, who art wroth with them that sin against thee, and sparest them that are penitent : we beseech thee to hear the prayers of thy people that call upon thee ; that we, which have most justly deserved the scourges of thine anger, may by thy great mercy be delivered from the same.
(If the Holy See is vacant, the following Collect is omitted.) (If the Holy See is vacant, the following Collect is omitted.)
Omnípotens sempiterne Deus, miserére famulo tuo Pontifici nostro (Nomen), et dírige eum secúndum tuam cleméntiam in viam salútis ætérnæ : ut, te donante, tibi placita cupiat, et tota virtúte perfíciat. Almighty and everlasting God, we beseech thee to have compassion upon N., our Pope, and by thy mercy govern him in the way of everlasting life : that, being endued with thy grace, he may ever seek those things that are pleasing unto thee, and with his whole strength perform the same.
Deus, a quo sancta desidéria, recta consília et justa sunt ópera : da servis tuis illam, quam mundus dare non potest, pacem ; ut et corda nostra mandátis tuis dedita, et, hóstium subláta formidine, témpora sint, tua protectióne, tranquilla. O God, from whom all holy desires, all good counsels, and all just works do proceed : give unto thy servants that peace which the world cannot give ; that our hearts may be set to obey thy commandments, and also that by thee we being defended from the fear of our enemies may pass our time in rest and quietness.
Ure igne Sancti Spíritus renes nostros et cor nostrum, Dómine : ut tibi casto corpore serviamus, et mundo corde placeámus. Grant, O Lord, we pray thee, that the fire of thy Holy Spirit may in such wise cleanse our reins and our hearts : that we serving thee in pureness both of body and soul may be found an acceptable people in thy sight.
Fidélium, Deus, ómnium conditor et redemptor, animábus famulórum famularumque tuárum remissiónem cunctórum tríbue peccatórum : ut indulgéntiam, quam semper optavérunt, piis supplicatiónibus consequántur. O God, the Creator and Redeemer of all them that believe : grant unto the souls of thy servants and handmaidens the remission of all their sins ; that, as they have ever desired thy merciful pardon, so by the supplications of their brethren they may receive the same.
Actiónes nostras, quæsumus, Dómine, aspirándo prævéni et adjuvándo proséquere : ut cuncta nostra orátio et operátio a te semper incipiat et per te cœpta finiátur. Prevent us, O Lord, in all our doings with thy most gracious favour, and further us with thy continual help : that in all our works begun, continued, and ended in thee, we may glorify thy holy Name, and finally by thy mercy obtain everlasting life.
Omnípotens sempiterne Deus, qui vivórum domináris simul et mortuórum, ómniumque miseréris quos tuos fide et ópere futuros esse prænoscis : te supplices exorámus ; ut, pro quibus effúndere preces decrevimus, quosque vel præsens sæculum adhuc in carne retinet vel futúrum jam exutos corpore suscépit, intercedéntibus ómnibus Sanctis tuis, pietátis tuæ cleméntia, ómnium delictórum suórum véniam consequántur. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum, Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus, per ómnia sæcula sæculórum. Almighty and everlasting God, who hast dominion both of the quick and the dead, who likewise hast mercy upon all men, whom by reason of their faith and works thou hast foreknown : we commend unto thee all those for whom we now do offer our prayers, whether in this world they still be held in the bonds of the flesh, or being delivered therefrom have passed into that which is to come ; beseeching thee that at the intercession of all thy Saints they may of thy bountiful goodness obtain the remission of all their sins. Through Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord : Who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, ever one God, world without end.
R. Amen. R. Amen.
V. Dóminus vobíscum. V. The Lord be with you.
R. Et cum spíritu tuo. R. And with thy spirit.
V. Exáudiat nos omnípotens et miséricors Dóminus. V. May the Almighty and Merciful Lord graciously hear us.
R. Amen. R. Amen.
V. Et fidélium ánimæ

Jesus League for November

Written by Jepoy Meneses on . Posted in Cool Catholics, Program Updates

St. Martin de Porres

Feastday: November 3
Patron of Barbers

St. Martin de Porres was born at Lima, Peru, in 1579. His father was a Spanish gentleman and his mother a coloured freed-woman from Panama. At fifteen, he became a lay brother at the Dominican Friary at Lima and spent his wholelife there-as a barber, farm laborer, almoner, and infirmarian among other things.

Martin had a great desire to go off to some foreign mission and thus earn the palm of martyrdom. However, since this was not possible, he made a martyr out of his body, devoting himself to ceaseless and severe penances. In turn, Godendowed him with many graces and wondrous gifts, such as, aerial flights and bilocation.

St. Martin’s love was all-embracing, shown equally to humans and to animals, including vermin, and he maintained a cats and dogs hospital at his sister’s house. He also possessed spiritual wisdom, demonstrated in his solving his sister’s marriage problems, raising a dowry for his niece inside of three day’s time, and resolving theological problems for the learned of his Order and for bishops. A close friend of St. Rose of Lima, this saintly man died on November 3, 1639 and was canonized on May 6, 1962. His feast day is November 3.

 

 

St. Charles Borromeo

Feastday: November 4
Patron of learning and the arts.

Charles was the son of Count Gilbert Borromeo and Margaret Medici, sister of Pope Pius IV. He was born at the familycastle of Arona on Lake Maggiore, Italy on October 2. He received the clerical tonsure when he was twelve and was sent to the Benedictine abbey of SS. Gratian and Felinus at Arona for his education.

In 1559 his uncle was elected Pope Pius IV and the following year, named him his Secretary of State and created him acardinal and administrator of the see of Milan. He served as Pius’ legate on numerous diplomatic missions and in 1562, was instrumental in having Pius reconvene the Council of Trent, which had been suspended in 1552. Charles played a leading role in guiding and in fashioning the decrees of the third and last group of sessions. He refused the headship of the Borromeo family on the death of Count Frederick Borromeo, was ordained a priest in 1563, and was consecrated bishop of Milan the same year. Before being allowed to take possession of his see, he oversaw the catechism, missal, and breviary called for by the Council of Trent. When he finally did arrive at Trent (which had been without a resident bishop for eighty years) in 1556, he instituted radical reforms despite great opposition, with such effectiveness that it became a model see. He put into effect, measures to improve the morals and manners of the clergy and laity, raised the effectiveness of the diocesan operation, established seminaries for the education of the clergy, founded a Confraternity of Christian Doctrine for the religious instruction of children and encouraged the Jesuits in his see. He increased the systems to the poor and the needy, was most generous in his help to the English college at Douai, and during his bishopric held eleven diocesan synods and six provincial councils. He founded a society of secular priests, Oblates of St. Ambrose (now Oblates of St. Charles) in 1578, and was active in preaching, resisting the inroads of protestantism, and bringing back lapsed Catholics to the Church. He encountered opposition from many sources in his efforts to reform people and institutions.

He died at Milan on the night of November 3-4, and was canonized in 1610. He was one of the towering figures of the Catholic Reformation, a patron of learning and the arts, and though he achieved a position of great power, he used it with humility, personal sanctity, and unselfishness to reform the Church, of the evils and abuses so prevalent among the clergy and the nobles of the times. His feast day is November 4th.

St.Elizabeth

Feastday: November 5

 

Not much information is known about Elizabeth, but she has the distinction of being one of the first to know about Mary’s great blessing as the Mother of God.

Zachary was a priest in Jerusalem whose wife, Elizabeth, Mary’s cousin, was beyond child-bearing age. He was told by an angel in a vision that they would have a son and should name him John. When he doubted this, he was struck dumb.Elizabeth was visited by Mary, at which time Mary spoke thehymn of praise now known at the Magnificat, and after John’s birth, Zachary’s speech was restored. This is all that is known of Elizabeth and Zachary, and is found in the New Testamentin Luke, Chapter 1. An unvarifiable tradition has Zachary murdered in the Temple when he refused to tell Herod where his son John was to be found. Their feast day is November 5th.

 

 

 

St. Leo the Great

Feastday: November 10

St. Leo the Great was born in Tuscany. As deacon, he was dispatched to Gaul as a mediator by Emperor Valentinian III. He reigned as Pope between 440 and 461. He persuaded Emperor Valentinian to recognize the primacy of the Bishopof Rome in an edict in 445. The doctrine of the Incarnation was formed by him in a letter to the Patriarch of Constantinople, who had already condemned Eutyches. At the Council of Chalcedon this same letter was confirmed as the expression of Catholic Faith concerning the Person of Christ.

All secular historical treatises eulogize his efforts during the upheaval of the fifth century barbarian invasion. His encounter with Attila the Hun, at the very gates of Romepersuading him to turn back, remains a historical memorial to his great eloquence. When the Vandals under Genseric occupied the city of Rome, he persuaded the invaders to desist from pillaging the city and harming its inhabitants. He died in 461, leaving many letters and writings of great historical value. His feast day is November 10th.

St. Frances Xavier Cabrini

Feastday: November 13

Patron of Immigrants

St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, Virgin (Feast day November 13) St. Frances was born in Lombardi, Italy in 1850, one of thirteen children. At eighteen, she desired to become a Nun, but poor health stood in her way. She helped her parentsuntil their death, and then worked on a farm with her brothers and sisters.

One day a priest asked her to teach in a girls’ school and she stayed for six years. At the request of her Bishop, she founded the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart to care for poor children in schools and hospitals. Then at the urging of Pope Leo XIII she came to the United States with six nuns in 1889 to work among the Italian immigrants.

Filled with a deep trust in God and endowed with a wonderful administrative ability, this remarkable woman soon founded schools, hospitals, and orphanages in this strange land and saw them flourish in the aid of Italian immigrants and children. At the time of her death, at Chicago, Illinois on December 22, 1917, her institute numbered houses in England, France, Spain, the United States, and South America. In 1946, she became the first American citizen to be canonized when she was elevated to sainthood by Pope Pius XII. St. Frances is the patroness of immigrants.

St. Albertus Magnus

Feastday: November 15

Patron of Scientist

Albertus Magnus, O.P. (1193/1206 – November 15, 1280), also known as Albert the Great and Albert of Cologne, is a Catholic saint. He was a German Dominican friar and abishop, who achieved fame for his comprehensive knowledge of and advocacy for the peaceful coexistence of science and religion. Those such as James A. Weisheipl and Joachim R. Söder have referred to him as the greatest German philosopher and theologian of the Middle Ages, an opinion supported by contemporaries such as Roger Bacon.[1] TheCatholic Church honours him as a Doctor of the Church, one of only 34 persons with that honor.

 

St. Catherine Laboure

Feastday: November 25

St. Catherine Laboure, virgin, was born on May 2, 1806. At an early age she entered the community of the Daughters of Charity, in Paris, France. Three times in 1830 the VirginMary appeared to St. Catherine Laboure, who then was a twenty-four year old novice.

On July 18, the first apparition occurred in the community’s motherhouse. St. Catherine beheld a lady seated on the rightside of the sanctuary. When St. Catherine approached her, the heavenly visitor told her how to act in time of trial and pointed to the altar as the source of all consolation. Promising to entrust St. Catherine with a mission which would cause her great suffering, the lady also predicted the anticlerical revolt which occurred at Paris in 1870.

On November 27, the lady showed St. Catherine the medal of the Immaculate Conception, now universally known as the “Miraculous Medal.” She commissioned St. Catherine to have one made, and to spread devotion to this medal. At that time, only her spiritual director, Father Aladel, knew of the apparitions. Forty-five years later, St. Catherine spoke fully of the apparitions to one of her superiors. She died on December 31, 1876, and was canonized on July 27, 1947. Her feast day is November 25.

St. Andrew

Feastday: November 30

Patron of Fishermen

Andrew, like his brother Simon Peter, was a fisherman. He became a disciple of the great St. John the Baptist, but whenJohn pointed to Jesus and said, “Behold the Lamb of God!” Andrew understood that Jesus was greater. At once he leftJohn to follow the Divine Master. Jesus knew that Andrew was walking behind him, and turning back, he asked, “what do you seek?” When Andrew answered that he would like to know where Jesus lived, Our Lord replied, “Come and see.” Andrew had been only a little time with Jesus when he realized that this was truly the Messiah.

From then on, he chose to follow Jesus. Andrew was thus the first disciple of Christ. Next, Andrew brought his brother Simon (St. Peter) to Jesus and Jesus received him, too, as His disciple. At first the two brothers continued to carry on their fishing trade and family affairs, but later, the Lord called them to stay with Him all the time. He promised to make them fishers of men, and this time, they left their nets for good. It is believed that after Our Lord ascended into Heaven, St. Andrew went to Greece to preach the gospel. He is said to have been put to death on a cross, to which he was tied, not nailed. He lived two days in that state of suffering, still preaching to the people who gathered around their beloved Apostle. Two countries have chosen St. Andrew as their patron – Russia and Scotland.

 


 

Sister Faustina

Jesus League for October

Written by Jepoy Meneses on . Posted in Cool Catholics, Program Updates


Saint Therese of Lisieux

Feast Day: October 1

Patron of the Missions

She felt an early call to religious life, and overcoming various obstacles, in 1888 at the early age of 15, became a nun and joined two of her older sisters in the cloistered Carmelite community of Lisieux,Normandy. After nine years as a Carmelite religious, having fulfilled various offices such as sacristanand assistant to the novice mistress, and having spent the last eighteen months in Carmel in a night of faith, she died of tuberculosis at the age of 24. The impact of The Story of a Soul, a collection of her autobiographical manuscripts, printed and distributed a year after her death to an initially very limited audience, was great, and she rapidly became one of the most popular saints of the twentieth century.Pope Pius XI made her the “star of his pontificate”.[1] She was beatified in 1923, and canonized in 1925. The speed of this process may be seen by comparison with that applied to a great heroine of Thérèse,Joan of Arc, who died in 1431 but was not canonized until 1920. Thérèse was declared co-patron of the missions with Francis Xavier in 1927, and named co-patron of France with Joan of Arc in 1944. On 19 October 1997 Pope John Paul II declared her the thirty-third Doctor of the Church, the youngest person, and only the third woman, to be so honored. Devotion to Thérèse has developed around the world.[2]

Thérèse lived a hidden life and “wanted to be unknown,” yet became popular after her death through her spiritual autobiography – she left also letters, poems, religious plays, prayers, and her last conversations were recorded by her sisters. Paintings and photographs – mostly the work of her sister Céline – further led to her being recognised by millions of men and women. According to one of her biographers, Guy Gaucher, after her death, “Thérèse fell victim to an excess of sentimental devotion which betrayed her. She was victim also to her language, which was that of the late nineteenth century and flowed from the religiosity of her age.” Thérèse herself said on her death-bed, “I only love simplicity. I have a horror of pretence”, and she spoke out against some of the Lives of saints written in her day,” We should not say improbable things, or things we do not know. We must see their real, and not their imagined lives.”[3]

The depth of her spirituality, of which she said, “my way is all confidence and love,” has inspired many believers. In the face of her littleness and nothingness, she trusted in God to be her sanctity. She wanted to go to heaven by an entirely new little way. “I wanted to find an elevator that would raise me to Jesus.” The elevator, she wrote, would be the arms of Jesus lifting her in all her littleness.

The Basilica of Lisieux is the second largest place of pilgrimage in France after Lourdes.

St. Francis of Assisi

Feastday: October 4

Patron of Animals, Merchants & Ecology

Named as Giovanni Francesco di Bernardone and was born on October 3, 1226. He was an Italian, Catholic Friar and Preacher. He founded the men’s Franciscan Order, the women’s Order of St. Claire and the lay Third Order of Saint Francis. St. Francis is one of the most venerated religious figures in history.

Francis was the son of a wealthy cloth merchant in Assisi, and he lived the high-spirited life typical of a wealthy young man, even fighting as a soldier for his home town.While going off to war in 1204, Francis had a vision that directed him back to Assisi, where he lost his taste for his worldly life.On a pilgrimage to Rome, Francis begged with the beggars at St. Peter’s Square. The experience moved him to live in poverty.Francis returned home, began preaching on the streets, and soon amassed a following. His order was endorsed by Pope Innocent III in 1210. He then founded the Order of Poor Clares, which was an enclosed order for women, as well as the Third Order of Brothers and Sisters of Penance. In 1219, he went to Egypt in an attempt to convert the Sultan. By this point, the Franciscan Order had grown to such an extent that its primitive organizational structure was no longer sufficient. He returned to Italy to organize the order. Once his organization was endorsed by the Pope, he withdrew increasingly from external affairs. In 1223, Francis arranged for the first Christmas manger scene.In 1224, he received the stigmata, making him the first person to bear the wounds of Christ’s Passion.He died in 1226 while preaching Psalm 141.

On July 16, 1228, he was pronounced a saint by Pope Gregory IX. He is known as one of the two patrons of Italy (with Catherine of Siena), and it is customary for Catholic and Anglican churches to hold ceremonies blessing animals on his feast day of 4 October.

 

St. Faustina Kowalska

Feastday: October 5

Maria Faustina Kowalska, commonly known as Saint Faustina, born Helenka Kowalska (August 25, 1905, near Lodz, Poland then in the Russian Empire – Died October 5, 1938, Kraków, Poland) was a Polish nun, mystic and visionary. She is venerated in the Roman Catholic Church as a saint, and is known as the Apostle of Divine Mercy.

Throughout her life, she reported a number of visions of Jesus and conversations with him, which she wrote about in her diary, later published as the book Diary: Divine Mercy in My Soul. Her Vatican biography quotes some of these conversations regarding the Divine Mercy devotion.

At age 20 she joined a convent in Warsaw and was later transferred to Plock, and then to Vilnius, where she met her confessor Michael Sopocko who supported her devotion to Divine Mercy. Faustina and Sopocko directed an artist to paint the first Divine Mercy image, based on Faustina’s reported vision of Jesus. Sopocko used the image to celebrate the first Mass on the first Sunday after Easter – which later became known as Divine Mercy Sunday.

In her diary Faustina predicted that her work would be suppressed for some time, then accepted again. Two decades after her death the Divine Mercy devotion was banned by the Vatican, but was approved again in 1978 and she was declared the first saint of the 21st century in April 2000.The Divine Mercy devotion is now followed by over 100 million Catholics.

St. Francis Borgia

Feastday: October 10
Patron against earthquakes; Portugal; Rota, Mariana

He was born Francesco Borgia de Candia d’Aragon within the Duchy of Gandia, Valencia on 28 October 1510. Although as a child he was very pious and wished to become a monk, his family sent him instead to the court of the Holy Roman Emperor. He distinguished himself there, accompanying the Emperor on several campaigns. In September 1526 at age 16, he married a Portuguese noblewoman in Madrid, Eleanor de Castro Melo e Menezes. They had eight children: Carlos in 1530, Isabel in 1532, Juan in 1533, Álvaro circa 1535, Juana also circa 1535, Fernando in 1537, Dorotea in 1538, and Alfonso in 1539.

In 1539, he convoyed the corpse of Isabella of Protugal, Philip II of Spain ‘s mother, to her burial place in Granada. It is said that, when he saw the effect of death on the beautiful empress, he decided to “never again serve a mortal master.”

In 1543 upon the death of his father, the 3rd Duke of Gandía, Francis became the 4th Duke of Gandia. By then 33 years old he had retired to his native place and led, with his wife, Eleanor de Castro Melo e Menezes and their family, a life devoted entirely to Jesus Christ and the Catholic Church.

But in 1546 his wife Eleanor died and then Francis was determined to enter the newly formed Society of Jesus making previously adequate provisions for the future of their children.

He put his affairs in order circa 1550, renounced his titles in favour of his eldest son Carlos de Borja-Aragon y de Castro-Melo, and became a Jesuit priest. Because of his high birth, great abilities and Europe-wide fame, he was immediately offered a cardinal’s hat. This, however, he refused, preferring the life of an itinerant preacher. In time, however, his friends persuaded him to accept the leadership role that nature and circumstances had destined him for: in 1554, he became the Jesuits’ commissary-general in Spain; and, in 1565, the third Father General or Superior General of the Society of Jesus.

St. Teresa of Avila

Feastday: October 15
Patron of Headache sufferers, Spanish Catholic Writers

Saint Teresa of Ávila, also called Saint Teresa of Jesus, baptized as Teresa Sánchez de Cepeda y Ahumada, (March 28, 1515 – October 4, 1582) was a prominent Spanish mystic, Roman Catholic saint, Carmelite nun, and writer of the Counter Reformation, and theologian of contemplative life through mental prayer. She was a reformer of the Carmelite Order and is considered to be, along with John of the Cross, a founder of the Discalced Carmelites.

In 1622, forty years after her death, she was canonized by Pope Gregory XV, and in 1970 named a Doctor of the Church by Pope Paul VI. Her books, which include her autobiography, The Life of Teresa of Jesus, and her seminal work, El Castillo Interior (The Interior Castle), are an integral part of the Spanish Renaissance literature as well as Christian mysticism and Christian meditation practices as she entails in her other important work Camino de Perfección (The Way of Perfection).

St. Luke

Feastday: October 18

Patron Physicians and Surgeons

Luke, the writer of the Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles, has been identified with St. Paul’s “Luke, the beloved physician” (Colossians 4:14). We know few other facts about Luke’s life from Scripture and from early Church historians.

It is believed that Luke was born a Greek and a Gentile. In Colossians 10-14 speaks of those friends who are with him. He first mentions all those “of the circumcision” — in other words, Jews — and he does not include Luke in this group. Luke’s gospel shows special sensitivity to evangelizing Gentiles. It is only in his gospel that we hear the parable of the Good Samaritan, that we hear Jesus praising the faith of Gentiles such as the widow of Zarephath and Naaman the Syrian (Lk.4:25-27), and that we hear the story of the one grateful leper who is a Samaritan (Lk.17:11-19). According to the early Church historian Eusebius Luke was born at Antioch in Syria. In our day, it would be easy to assume that someone who was a doctor was rich, but scholars have argued that Luke might have been born a slave. It was not uncommon for families to educate slaves in medicine so that they would have a resident family physician. Not only do we have Paul’s word, but Eusebius, St. Jerome and Saint Irenaeus and Caius, a second-century writer, all refer to Luke as a physician. He is venerated as Saint Luke, patron saint of artists, physicians, surgeons, students, and butchers.

Bl. John Paul II

Feastday: October 22
Patron of World Youth Day (Co- Patron)

Blessed Pope John Paul II, born Karol Józef Wojtyła 18 May 1920, reigned as Pope of the Catholic Church and Sovereign of Vatican City from 16 October 1978 until his death on 2 April 2005, at 84 years and 319 days of age. His was the second-longest documented pontificate, which lasted 26 years and 168 days; only Pope Pius IX (1846–1878) who served 31 years, has reigned longer. Pope John Paul II is the only Slavic or Polish pope to date and was the first non-Italian Pope since Dutch Pope Adrian VI (1522–1523).

 

John Paul II has been acclaimed as one of the most influential leaders of the 20th century. It is widely held that he was instrumental in ending communism in his native Poland and eventually all of Europe. Conversely, he denounced the excesses of capitalism. John Paul II is widely said to have significantly improved the Catholic Church’s relations with Judaism, Islam, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and theAnglican Communion. Though criticised by progressives for upholding the Church’s teachings against artificial contraception and the ordination of women, he was also criticised by traditionalists for his support of the Church’s Second Vatican Council and its reform of the Liturgy as well as his ecumenical efforts.

He was one of the most-travelled world leaders in history, visiting 129 countries during his pontificate. He spoke Italian, French, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Croatian, and Latin as well as his native Polish. As part of his special emphasis on the universal call to holiness, he beatified 1,340 people and canonised 483 saints, more than the combined tally of his predecessors during the last five centuries. On 19 December 2009, John Paul II was proclaimed venerable by his successor Pope Benedict XVI and was beatified on 1 May 2011.

 

St. Jude Thaddaeus

Feastday: October 28

Patron of Desperate Cases

 

St. Jude, known as Thaddaeus, was a brother of St. James the Less, and a relative of Our Saviour. St. Jude was one of the 12 Apostles of Jesus.

Ancient writers tell us that he preached the Gospel in Judea, Samaria, Idumaea, Syria, Mesopotamia, and Lybia. According to Eusebius, he returned to Jerusalem in the year 62, and assisted at the election of his brother, St. Simeon, as Bishop of Jerusalem.

He is an author of an epistle (letter) to the Churches of the East, particularly the Jewish converts, directed against the heresies of the Simonians, Nicolaites, and Gnostics. This Apostle is said to have suffered martyrdom in Armenia, which was then subject to Persia. The final conversion of the Armenian nation to Christianity did not take place until the third century of our era.

Jude was the one who asked Jesus at the Last Supper why He would not manifest Himself to the whole world after His resurrection. Little else is known of his life. Legend claims that he visited Beirut and Edessa; possibly martyred with St. Simon in Persia.

Jude is invoked in desperate situations because his New Testament letter stresses that the faithful should persevere in the environment of harsh, difficult circumstances, just as their forefathers had done before them. Therefore, he is the patron saint of desperate cases and his feast day is October 28. Saint Jude is not the same person as Judas Iscariot who betrayed Our Lord and despaired because of his great sin and lack of trust in God’s mercy.

CFC SFL Households

Channel SFL

Watch videos that will inspire you. Subscribe to our channel and learn more about us.

Gallery

Gallery

View pictures and videos of our events and activities here and relive the moment.

Connect with us

Downloads

Go to our downloads page. Get a digital copy of our logo, powerpoints, etc.

Contact Us

CFC SFL logo

Appartelle 12 Starmall Complex Edsa cor. Shaw Blvd., Madaluyong City

Telephone: +63 2 7182213
Email: email@cfcsfl.org